Making Moulded Chocolates at Home

Chocolate hearts!

Chocolate hearts!

After Kirsten’s demonstrations here in Shanghai, she gave me a few bags of Callebaut Origins Callets as gifts. I gave a couple away to my classmates because most of them have never tried Callebaut chocolates before, and I decided to make moulded chocolates with the remaining 3 packets of Ecuador, Madagascar and Sao Thome dark chocolates.

Callebaut Origins: Ecuador, Sao Thome, Madagascar

Callebaut Origins: Ecuador, Sao Thome, Madagascar

I own quite a few Chocolate World moulds back home but I wasn’t able to bring any to Shanghai with me. In order to be able to use these quality chocolates to practice my skills, I decided to buy a cheap one online. The mould I bought is pretty average, as you would be able to see in some photos below, but it is still acceptable as a practice tool.

Set up: chocolate, spatula, mould and cotton buds

Set up: chocolate, spatula, mould, scraper and cotton buds

The items pictured above are the very basic items you need to make moulded chocolates. Instead of a metal chocolate scraper and a tempering spatula, I had to use a plastic scraper and a rice ladle instead due to my limited resources here in Shanghai 😛

Making moulded chocolates is actually quite a messy affair, especially if you do not own a chocolate melting tank of a size that is bigger than your chocolate mould. So in order to minimise my cleaning effort, I used a sheet of baking paper to ensure that I had a chocolate-mess-friendly working space.

Filling moulds with chocolate

Filling moulds with chocolate

 

Moulding chocolate

Moulding chocolate

As you can see from the picture above, you can imagine the amount of cleaning you’d have to do without the sheet of baking paper. I have used plastic wrap in place of the baking paper in the past but it is not as effective since it broke quite easily, especially after the chocolate has set. Using a sheet baking paper also has another advantage, given its relative durability, the chocolate can be scraped off with a scraper without the paper breaking, unlike a plastic wrap.

Nicely moulded chocolate

Nicely moulded chocolates

 

Dark chocolate ganache filling

Dark chocolate ganache filling

At this stage, you can pretty much use any filling. I chose dark chocolate ganache mainly because I didn’t have much to work with. I only added boiled cream to make my ganache, no butter or glucose, so it is quite a rich and dark ganache, which I love.

Sealing the chocolates

Sealing the chocolates

I learned this sealing method from Kirsten’s Shanghai demonstration. In the level 1 class at Savour, we were taught to scoop melted chocolate onto the mould and scraping it at a 90 degree angle. I find this method of using the guitare sheet a lot easier because I always struggled to get a smooth base with the method taught at Savour’s Level 1 class. This guitare sheet sealing method is also a lot cleaner!

Final product

Final product

Voila! These are the final product! Looking at the picture, you may think that I used two different moulds to make this batch of chocolates, but these were actually made with the same mould. I have no idea why the manufacturer decided to include two different types of love hearts in one mould – what’s worse, the finishing of the two also differ! Look at how shiny the rounded hearts look compared to the flat ones! But I guess this is what you get from using a $8 mould (as opposed to a $25 one!).

It felt great to be able to make these at home after so long! It was definitely a different experience after learning some cleaner and neater methods to mould chocolates from Kirsten’s Shanghai demonstrations! I’ve been making chocolates everyday since in order to use up all my supplies – my friends and classmates have been fed well 😛

Advertisements

13 thoughts on “Making Moulded Chocolates at Home

  1. Pingback: Introducing ‘new’ bloggers #7 | thenotsocreativecook

  2. I love molding bonbons too! I think the guitare sheet is really convenient, but I always practice without because it’s a skill to master! I can’t do it perfectly, but relying on the guitare sheet deprives you of a chance to master molding!

  3. Pingback: Tips: The importance of tempering correctly in chocolate making | Petite Pâtissière

Share your thoughts! x

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s